Category Archives: Public Policy

How government policy exacerbates hurricanes like Harvey

Here’s the (very timely) cover story of the latest issue of The Economist. Quoting from the article, “Underpricing (of flood insurance) encourages the building of new houses and discourages existing owners from renovating or moving out. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, houses that repeatedly flood account for 1% of NFIP’s properties but 25-30% of its claims. Five states, Texas among them, have more than 10,000 such households and, nationwide, their number has been going up by around 5,000 each year. Insurance is meant to provide a signal about risk; in this case, it stifles it.”

As if global warming were not enough of a threat, poor planning and unwise subsidies make floods worse.

On the Economics of Price Gouging

This is an oldie (from 2007) but goody – on the economics of price gouging in the wake of a hurricane. The principles discussed are timeless and well worth pondering!

Mike Munger of Duke University recounts the harrowing (and fascinating) experience of being in the path of a hurricane and the economic forces that were set in motion as a result. One of the most important is the import of urgent supplies when thousands of people are without electricity. Should prices be allowed to rise freely or should the government restrict prices? Listen in as Munger and EconTalk host Russ Roberts discuss the human side of economics after a catastrophe.

Harvey’s Test: Businesses Struggle With Flawed Insurance as Floods Multiply

This WSJ article provides a fairly comprehensive look at the financial implications for #Harvey for small business. What’s particularly disconcerting is that NFIP is already for all intents and purposes technically insolvent (current debt to the US Treasury stands at around $25 billion) and Congress is supposed to reauthorize funding for the program’s next five years by September 30. On the lighter side of things, it’s fun to see a couple of academic colleagues’ names in print in this article; specifically, Erwann Michel-Kerjan of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Board on Financial Management of Catastrophes and Ben Collier, who is a faculty member at Temple University’s Fox School of Business.

Hurricane will strain a National Flood Insurance Program out of step with needs of small businesses in era of extreme weather.

Catastrophe Bonds Fall as Hurricane Harvey Bears Down on Texas

Good article from Bloomberg on how catastrophe (AKA “cat”) bonds are a unique asset class for investors and how such bonds disrupt traditional reinsurance markets.  For a broader perspective of these topics, also see the August 2016 WSJ article entitled “The Insurance Industry Has Been Turned Upside Down by Catastrophe Bonds” and my blog posting entitled “Cat Bonds“.

Cat bonds represent a form of securitization in which risk is transferred to investors rather than insurers or reinsurers. Typically, an insurer or reinsurer will issue a cat bond to investors such as life insurers, hedge funds and pension funds. The bonds are structured similarly to traditional bonds, with an important exception: if a pre-specified event such as a hurricane occurs prior to the maturity of the bonds, then investors risk losing accrued interest and/or the principal value of the bonds. This is why these bonds are falling in price – investors expect that the payment triggers tied to storms like #Harvey will reduce the payments received by holders of these bonds.

Bonds tied to weather risks tumbled the most in seven months as Hurricane Harvey advances on Texas’s Gulf Coast.

Place Your Bets: When Will the U.S. Hit the Debt Ceiling?

This is an excellent article on how asset prices impound political risks, and the role of so-called “prediction markets” in assessing political event probabilities (in this case, the likelihood of the U.S. defaulting on its debt).

Prediction markets add a crowdsourced opinion to the chaos of Washington.